You & Me

This week’s new single releases – 28 April

This week’s new single releases – 28 April

Phil Lickley’s weekly roundup of new single releases.

Amplify Dot – ‘Kurt Cobain’
[rating:3/5]
Refreshingly delivering a female rapper to the listing in a male-dominated feed, Amplify Dot’s second hit named after the Nirvana singer is a well constructed affair peppered with some intriguing audio hooks, but it lacks an ear for a tune as seen from contemporary Azealia Banks and the lyrical chorus – based around the live fast, die young concept – has been overused. With a muddy production feel and a lack of clarity on the rap, its chorus redeems it alongside some well written rap elements, and gives it some replay value, but it lacks any standout moment in its brief running time, but it’s a song that grows.
Watch the video.

Bo Bruce – ‘Save Me’
[rating:3.5/5]
A runner-up in last year’s ‘The Voice’, Bo Bruce releases her first original solo effort ‘Save Me’ and it’s a smooth, building swelling ballad. Though the lyrics are not particularly profound they are delivered with conviction by Bruce whose voice portrays the cracking emotion of, say, Ellie Goulding, but is far more pleasing to the ear. One of her songs is being used in the new Star Trek film and you can hear how this song could also slot into a soundtrack. Nicely produced and built up, it’s a touching, pleasing ballad that is interestingly sung without going into the wailing that befalls some “reality” singers.
Watch the video.

Daughter – ‘Human’
[rating:1.5/5]
Sounding very much like the words and music were written at different times, ‘Human’ is a very disjointed affair that is difficult to listen to, compounded by the almost feedback-sound of the choruses. Elsewhere her voice is strong but the track doesn’t gel at all and feels like a truly awkward listen. I’m all for experimental and free-flowing tracks, but this feels too much like a misfire.
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Disclosure feat. Eliza Doolittle – ‘You & Me’
[rating:2/5]
‘You & Me’ manages to achieve the incredible and reduce Doolittle’s sexy, very listenable vocals into the most tedious clichéd vocals ever. Laid over a repetitive electronic drum beat, this washes over you without leaving any particular impression, lacking the key hooks that made ‘White Noise’ such an enjoyable track. The chorus isn’t too bad and is the best part of the song, but the vocals just get trapped in and amongst a really artificial sounding music track. It gets better with each listen but is still a disappointment.
Watch the video.

Elsie – ‘Your Loving Arms’
[rating:3.5/5]
A cover of a Billie Ray Martin track from 1994, Elsie’s version is much slower and less clubbing-focussed. Though the first one has a bigger appeal with its fast-paced beat, this is a much more credible version. With a simpler, stronger production value that balances well against Elsie’s growly vocals, it’s a really enjoyable listen, both touching and well held together with the piano. It’s not the best example of the genre but the chorus really kicks in and makes this well worth downloading this week.
Watch the video.

Emilia Mitiku – ‘You’re Breaking My Heart’
[rating:4/5]
Following the brilliant ‘You’re Not Right For Me’, Mitiku’s follow-up is more uptempo but keeps the same simple, smooth production values. It doesn’t quite have the choral hook of its predecessor, but this is replaced by a strong bridge and laid-back saxophone and whistle element which is well slotted in. With a nod towards country and Dolly Parton but throwing in the sax, it’s another strong single from Mitiku that you’ll find your foot tapping to.
Watch the video.

Fall Out Boy – ‘Young Volcanoes’
[rating:3.5/5]
The third single cut from their latest album – the second passed me by through lack of publicity – ‘Young Volcanoes’ is in a similar vain to the recent lead single. With a more tribal sound than we’re used to from the band, it still keeps the poppy hooks of their more recent material. It might resort to a more sonic sound than the lyrical twists they normally employ, but it’s a refreshing change of direction for the band but equally one that works, even if hardcore fans will probably disagree.
Watch the video.

Johnny Hates Jazz – ‘Magnetized’
[rating:4/5]
A massive twenty-two years since their last album, if lead single ‘Magnetized’ is anything to go by it was a good idea to stage a comeback. Instantly catchy with a vocal and musical hook that work well together, you’ll tap your foot and sing-a-long to this song pretty quickly. A brilliant return for the band with a strong, well put-together hit.
Watch the video.

Kirsty Bertarelli And Ronan Keating – ‘Send Out A Message’
[rating:3/5]
Singer-songwriter Bertarelli, former Miss UK and co-writer of All Saints’ ‘Black Coffee’, teams up with Ronan Keating on this uptempo country song. Keating sounds unrecognisable on the record and their vocals work well in juxtaposition, though Bertarelli’s sound is not particularly strong and it ends up sounding like a professionally produced karaoke hit. It’s an enjoyable, perky number that will grab you, with a clear singable style, but there’s something missing from making it sound thoroughly polished. It has some moments of brilliance, though these are offset by other moments such as the repetitive ending which knock it down a little but overall it’s a sunny, enjoyable hit with some flaws.
Watch the video.

Misha B – ‘Here’s To Everything (Ooh La La)’
[rating:3/5]
Misha B’s third single blends up a Teena Marie / The Fugees sample with a throbbing-reggae themed beat. A speedy track that sounds better than her first couple of songs, it wears its Rihanna sound on its sleeve and you can almost forgive the over-produced feel because of the attitude weaved through the song. It’s no groundbreaker but it’ll fit in nicely into a club set and is a powerful listen that stands a little higher than its competitors.
Watch the video.

Palma Violets – ‘We Found Love’
[rating:2.5/5]
Not a cover of the Calvin Harris track as you might expect, this is a muddily produced indie song. One of the nominees for the BBC’s ‘Sound of 2013’ poll if you like your music raw and echoey you’ll enjoy this, sounding a little like Spector with a less competent sound engineer. I’m not a big fan, with the song sounding too drawly and messy. It has some appeal and indie fans will like it, and the ‘la la’ hook kicks in well, but it’s just too confused for my tastes.
Watch the video.

Paramore – ‘Still Into You’
[rating:3.5/5]
The follow-up to ‘Now’, ‘Still Into You’ showcases a very similar sound but is more instantly likeable and sounding more like their poppier big hits that launched them to fame. The guitar riff sounds strangely familiar but elsewhere it’s a well created mix of instrumentation and vocalisation. One of their best tunes in a while, this mixes their rock and pop sides well to create a more agreeable, engaging pop-rock crossover hit, with some attitude flowing through the lyrics alongside a sweet love story, though not in a sappy way.
Watch the video.

Pitbull feat. Christina Aguilera – ‘Feel This Moment’
[rating:3.5/5]
Lifting A-ha’s ‘Take On Me’ keyboard riff for part of its hook, this is a far better track than you’d expect from Pitbull. Though much of his verses and production work are pretty familiar, the interpolation of modern styles with an older song serves him as well here as it did on his ‘Back In Time’ hit. Aguilera’s on fine form here and the balance of her vocals and Pitbull’s, admittedly clichéd, rap works well. It may cherry-pick its appeal from a song well in the public consciousness and Aguilera’s powerful vocals, but it’s a mix that works really well.
Watch the video.

Post Author: Luke Glassford

Post written by Luke Glassford - founder, editor, writer and everything else at All-Noise.